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Do You Understand This English Sentence?

Do You Understand This English Sentence?

Date: Oct 08 2018

Topic: Reading

Author: englishteacher24/7

Lesson

This forum is created to assist you in understanding English sentences. Please feel free to participate and ask questions.

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inventive2

inventive2

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Thank you very much 😊
Thanks Mr. Alston for your explanations 🙏

09:05 AM Dec 14 2018 |

bora_78

bora_78Super Member!

Turkey

Thanks Mr. Alston for your correction.I edited

07:06 AM Dec 14 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Bora, you did a good job in writing your sentences. In your future tense sentence, add “be” in front of able.


Fatemeh, you also did a good job in writing your sentences, especially on #2 (present tense) one using “ing” to indicate something presently ongoing.


In sentence #1, change “succeeded” to “successfully.” I think you used it because adding “ed” makes it past tense, but adding “last year” in your sentence makes it past tense.

05:20 AM Dec 14 2018 |

inventive2

inventive2

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Hello Mr. Alston. Thank you very much 🙏
1- Mary succeeded came through the hard stages of the Olympic last year
2- Mary is coming through her treatment at the hospital now
3- Mary will come through this upsetting time and start again

03:18 PM Dec 13 2018 |

bora_78

bora_78Super Member!

Turkey

Hi Mr. Alston


At first thank you so much for your all explanations.


My sentences are below;



- Although, Mary has problems,she came through


-Mary lost her job last week but ,she always come through


-Mary won’t be able to  come through her exam because she didn’t study enough.


08:50 AM Dec 13 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Here is a challenge for everyone:


Question: Can you take the following name and phrasal verb and write a sentence in the past, present, and future tenses?


“Mary” & “come through”


Fatemeh, you’re welcome.


Amira, we need you for this!

02:14 AM Dec 13 2018 |

inventive2

inventive2

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Hello Mr. Alston
Thank you very much 🙏

11:04 AM Dec 12 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Examples of positive and negative use of the phrase “coming through.”


Positive


“You always come through on your English lessons!”


“Don’t worry; Mary is the come through daughter.”


Negative


“Jim never comes through, he’s very unreliable.”


Coming through is not one of Jan’s assets.”


The context determines the meaning of the phrase.

09:23 PM Dec 11 2018 |

inventive2

inventive2

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Thank you very much for your explanation 🙏

07:15 AM Dec 10 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Positive/Negative use of the phrase coming through>

1. “Coming through” basically means “to succeed or do what is expected.”


2. It’s made positive or negative by what is written before the phase.


3. In the lesson, the use of the words “chances” and “challenging” is a hint that Tom’s cooking is not good because if he was a great cook, the speaker would have used other words like, “you’re in for a real treat” or “I wished Tom would have invited me!”

bora_78

bora_78Super Member!

Turkey

Hi Mr.Alston 


Thank you very much for your explanation.I learnt a new thing because of you.In this case my answer is totally false.

09:40 AM Dec 09 2018 |

inventive2

inventive2

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Hello Mr. Alston
Thank you so much🙏
Excuse me, please explain more about how to identify positive or negative. Thank you very much 🙏

05:02 AM Dec 09 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 7 Explanation: The phrasal verb “coming through” can be used in a positive or negative sense depending on how you construct the sentence.


Claudio’s answer is correct so I won’t repeat it.


Because the words “chances are your chances of coming through” is used, it gives you the thought that it’s used in a negative sense.


The speaker is telling Bill in a hidden nice way, “I hope you don’t get sick from Tom’s cooking!”


Good efforts everyone!

inventive2

inventive2

Iran, Islamic Republic Of

Hello Mr. Alston. Thanks for your new lesson 🙏
I think that means: Racing and competition between two people in a challenge

11:06 AM Dec 07 2018 |

Cláudio

Cláudio

Brazil

Hi, everybody!


Knowing that one of the meanings of the phrasal verb “come through” is: “succeed in surviving or dealing with”, what comes to mind is that Tom isn’t really a good cook. The odds of surviving are against Bill! rsrsrs

11:03 AM Dec 07 2018 |

bora_78

bora_78Super Member!

Turkey

Hi Mr. Alston 


I detected this,


Actually,Tom invited to Bill in order to cooking competition.

09:40 AM Dec 07 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Lesson No. 7: “Reading between the lines” is an idiom which means to detect or perceive a hidden meaning without it being said directly. Consider this sentence:


“Hey Bill, I heard that Tom invited your family over for dinner, and he’s cooking. Chances are your chances of coming through are challenging.”


Question:


Can you explain the hidden meaning of the last sentence?


Claudio, welcome back!

Cláudio

Cláudio

Brazil

Hello, Mr. Gray and all the participants in this forum. After some time away, I would like to join the discussions again and to enjoy all the benefits it provides to us. I’m looking forward to the next lesson, and I hope to be able to give my humble contribution. See you all soon. 

07:09 PM Dec 06 2018 |

englishteacher24/7

United States

Bora, you’re welcome. The next lesson will be on “Reading between the lines.”


Please stay tuned.

07:42 AM Dec 05 2018 |

bora_78

bora_78Super Member!

Turkey

Mr.Alston Thanks for your kind reply.

12:34 PM Nov 30 2018 |

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